Top 5 Energy Boosters

 Top 5 Energy Boosters

Top 5 Energy Boosters

With so many ads about which super foods are best, it can be confusing to decipher what's a scam and what's the truth. That's why I compiled a list of the top five energy boosting foods that will give you true, lasting energy to keep you hopping all day! Oatmeal

Oats contain the energizing and stress-lowering B vitamin family, which helps transform carbs into usable energy. Oats are also low on the glycemic index because they have a lot of fiber. That means that your body gets a steady stream of energy, as opposed to a short-term spike, because the carbohydrates gradually flow into your bloodstream.

The key here is to look for high-fiber oatmeal, like oat bran. For the best nutrition kick, avoid instant oatmeal and stick with more natural varieties, then add your own sweetness.

Take A Free Quiz Here...

Lentils

Beans are a great source of fiber, which translates to a slow release of glucose, as well as B vitamins, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, calcium and copper. Lentils provide both carbohydrates and protein, making them a great addition to any meal. Lentils help reduce your cholesterol and blood pressure, and they're low in fat and calories to boot.

Bananas

Bananas provide a lot of potassium, an electrolyte that helps maintain normal nerve and muscle function. Unlike some nutrients, the body doesn't store potassium for long periods of time. This means that your potassium level can drop during times of stress or during strenuous exercise when the nutrient is lost through excessive sweating. The sugar in bananas is an easily digested form of carbohydrate. Other fruits such as apples, grapes, peaches and pineapples also make great energizing and refreshing snacks. We all know we need to be eating more fruits in our diet!

Chocolate

Studies show that chocolate can elevate your energy levels by way of certain bioactive compounds such as tyramine and phenylethylamine. Chocolate has also been claimed to improve anemia, awaken the appetite, aid in digestion, and improve longevity. Chocolate contains sugar and caffeine along with fat and calories so consume in moderation. When possible, opt for dark chocolate or raw cacao for the highest source of antioxidants.

Almonds

These little guys are great if you're looking to improve your focus and mental clarity. Monounsaturated fats such as almonds provide essential fatty acids, known as omega-3s and omega-6s that produce an alert mental state.

Healthy Fats

Other healthy fats to include in your diet are avocados, seeds, nuts, olive oil, and fish oil. Of course, you'll want to check with your health practitioner before making drastic changes to your diet.

Incorporating these foods into your daily menu takes some planning, so here are some ideas you can use to ensure you'll have all the energy you need every day.

Breakfast

* Smoothies: For breakfast, a banana fruit smoothie is a quick and easy way to get the potassium your body requires for normal function. In a blender, combine a small banana, some frozen berries of your choice, ice, 1/2 cup low fat milk, and a teaspoon of vanilla. You can also add a tablespoon of peanut butter or some raw cacao powder as well. If dairy is off the list for then I suggest you use almond - coconut - or another substitute of your choosing.

Oatmeal: If you need a quick breakfast, you may not always think of oatmeal, or you may think of instant oatmeal, which isn't as nutritious. Some companies are making instant oatmeal healthier by not adding as much sugar and artificial flavoring, but you'll always want to compare the sugar and fiber amounts across a few different brands to find the most nourishing oatmeal.

* Cereals: Another great alternative to a bowl of hot oatmeal is bran and muesli cereals. They contain a lot of the energy boosting nutrients of oatmeal, and often contain healthy nuts and dried fruits as well.

Snacks

* Almonds: These nuts are perfect as a mid afternoon snack. Grab a handful and take them to work with you in a snack cup or baggie.

* Dark Chocolate: When you're feeling sluggish, a small dark chocolate bar is all you need for a great pick me up that will last longer than an hour or two.

Dinner Side Dishes

* Beans: Lentils are a great side dish to enhance many dinner entrees such as tacos and burgers. You can also make lentils a main dish by combining several types into one dish as a bean soup or bean casserole served with cornbread. Another way to eat lentils is to add some pepper and melted shredded cheese as part of a healthy lunch.

Working these naturally energizing foods into your daily routine doesn't have to be difficult. With a little imagination and effort, you can have all the energy you need to stay awake and alert throughout the entire day! Start your Healthy Green Smoothie Lifestyle with this FREE report

Top 5 Energy Boosters by Donnie Lewis


Eating Healthy - The GI Way

 Eating Healthy - The GI Way 

Eating Healthy - The GI Way

EATING HEALTHY – THE GI WAY! Researchers continue to gather evidence regarding the GI's far-reaching health benefits since the positive effects of a low-GI eating plan were discovered in the 1980's. Most nutritionists and health professionals agree today that a low-GI diet plan not only helps to keep you slim, but lower your risk of getting type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some forms of cancer.

The diet has also proved to improve memory, concentration and mood. GI means Glycemic Index. It is a measure of how long it takes to break your food down into glucose. The key to the low-GI diet is focused on slow-acting carbohydrate foods, which helps to keep your blood glucose level steady. The Glycemic Index is a way to rank foods according to the effect they have on our blood glucose levels. 

This is especially true in regard to carbohydrates. Specifically, the glycemic index measures how much a 50-gram portion of carbohydrates raises your blood sugar levels compared with a control. The control is either white bread or pure glucose. All carbohydrates cause some temporary rise in your blood glucose level. 

This is called the glycemic response. And this response is affected by a variety of factors, including the amount of food eaten, the type of carbohydrates, the method used to prepare the food, as well as the degree of processing, to name just a few. The slower your body processes the food, the slower the insulin is released, and the healthier the overall effect is on your body. 

Also see:- The Ultimate Diabetic Cook Book

And it's the foods that raise your blood sugar level slowly, that you, as a person desiring to lose weight, want to eat. And there are several reasons for this. First, these foods - many of which you'll discover are high in fiber - will just keep you feeling fuller for a longer period of time. And any of you who have been on a diet can be thankful for this. What effects the GI? 

1. Level of food processing 

2. Physical structure, starch, protein, acidity, soluble fiber and fat. How can low GI carbs help with weight loss? 1. Delays hunger pangs 2. Promote a faster fat loss 

3. Causes less drop in metabolic rate. 

4. It reduces dramatic fluctuations in blood glucose levels. 

5. It reduces insulin demands significantly. Benefits from low GI diets. 1. Easy to follow 2. Greater variety of foods 3. Support exercise program 4. Benefits blood lipid profile 5. Environmentally friendly Foods containing sugar are not necessary high GI. Sucrose (table sugar) has moderate GI. The basics of a low GI diet: Eat whole-grain bread, mountain bread of stone ground bread, Pasta, noodles, barley, sweet potato, legumes, oats, muesli, low GI serials. 

Long-term weight management. 

1. Diet. Eating to appetite with the right foods. 

2. Exercise regularly, incorporate more intense sessions 

3. Be active in daily life. 

4. Relation hip with food (women).

Heart Health When eating meals that cause blood glucose levels to spike, it tend to lower 'good' HDL cholesterol and raise triglycerides, harmful fats that increase your risk of heart disease. High blood glucose also produces unstable forms of oxygen molecules, called free radicals, that damage arteries and make cholesterol more likely to stick on artery walls.. 

The raised levels of insulin, produced to cope with surges of blood glucose, set in motion changes that raise your blood pressure. This makes your blood more likely to form clots and increase inflammation, which doctors know is closely related to heart attack risks.

Cancer risk According to the latest research, high blood glucose levels may increase your changes of getting cancer It seems that the high insulin levels promote an environment in which it is easier for certain tumors to grow. Research is still going on, and it is too early to be absolutely certain about the connection between blood glucose and cancer. Yet there is a reason for concern for the following types of cancer: colon and rectal, breast, endometrial (womb lining), prostate and pancreatic cancer.

The Road to Diabetes It has been known since a long time that a diet high with fast-acting, high-GI foods will significantly increase your risk of Type 2 diabetes. In Type 2 diabetes, your body can't make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose levels under control. Before you reach that stage, your body may develop insulin resistance and/or metabolic syndrome (syndrome X) – a pre-diabetic state in which your body progressively struggles to control blood glucose.

Many people are unaware that they have these conditions, yet studies show that they are increasingly common in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the UK. More than 10% of adults have insulin resistance. Fortunately, you don't develop diabetes overnight and the journey towards diabetes can be redirected at any point. Eating more slow-acting foods is one of the best ways of preventing or reversing this condition. The earlier you start, the better.

Mood and Memory The brain is very sensitive to the levels of glucose in the blood. Both high and low levels can cause problems with your mood and memory. Low levels may cause symptoms of depression, poor memory and low concentration, while high levels of blood glucose also impair the brain, shrinking the part that stores memories and increasing the risk of dementia. The answer is to keep your blood glucose levels steady by eating a low-GI diet. To follow this diet is simple: there is no need of counting calories; no food is forbidden, and because the way you are eating, you are unlikely to feel hungry.

Focus on eating a low-GI meal. Although eating a medium-GI meal now and then will do your diet no harm. This is not meant to be a strict dietary regime that is endured for a few weeks and dropped, but a healthy eating plan for life. So choose the meals that entice you. Here follow Ten Tips to Lower the GI of Your Diet The following are practical tips to help you make the change to low-GI eating. 

There is no specific order. Basically, you should attack the changes that you think you'll find easiest first. Make the changes gradually - it can take 6 weeks for a new behavior to become a habit. 

1. Aim to eat 7 servings of fruit and vegetables every day. Preferable of 3 or more different colors. Make sure you fill half your dinner plate with vegetables. 

2. Cut back on potatoes. Have one or two boiled new potatoes, or make a cannellini bean and potato mash, replacing half the potato with cannellini beans. Try other lower GI starchy vegetables for a change, like a piece of sweet potato. 

3. Choose a really grainy bread, such as stoneground whole meal, real sourdough bread, or a soy and linseed bread. (Look for the GI symbol on the breads when you buy. 

4. Start the day with smart carbs, like natural muesli or traditional (not instant) porridge oats, or one of the lower GI processed breakfast cereals that will trickle fuel into your engine. 

5. Look for the lower-GI rices (basmali, Doongara Clever rice or Moolgirl) , and choose low-GI whole grains such as pearl barley, buckwheat, burghul (bulgul) ,or quinoa. 

6. Learn to love legumes and eat them often. Add red kidney beans to a chili, chickpeas to a stir-fry, a 4-bean salad to a barbecue, and beans or lentils to a casserole or soup. 

7. Include at least one low-GI carb food at every meal and choose low-GI snacks. 

8. Incorporate a lean protein source with every meal, such ass lean meat, skinless chicken, eggs, fish and seafood, or legumes and tofu if you are vegetarian. 

9. Use the GI-lowering effect or acidic foods like vinegar, citrus fruit and sourdough. Add vinaigrette dressing to salads and sprinkle lemon juice on vegetables like asparagus. Acids slows down the digestion of carbs and lower the overall GI of the meal. 

10.Limit (preferably avoid) high-GI refined flour products, whether from the supermarket or home-baked, such as biscuits, cakes, pastries, crumpets, crackers and biscuits. As a general rule of thumb, the less processed a food is, the lower it's GI value. 

The more work the body has to do in digesting it, that means the slower the sugar is released - and that is good news for keeping blood glucose levels steady. After a few weeks of eating the GI way you'll wonder why you didn't start sooner as you may feel more energetic. And if the nutritionists are correct, adopting the low-GI eating plan may be the best thing you've ever done for your health.


This is one chapter out of my new book:"Recipe for a Long, Healthy Life." You can order the book by visiting http://www.yourhealthylivingguide.com/

Eating Healthy - The GI Way by Adrian Joele



Top Tips for Buying Designer Glasses for Children

Top Tips for Buying Designer Glasses for Children 

Whether it’s your first time buying glasses for your kids or you’re just in the market for an upgraded pair of specs, the process need not be a stressful one. While many parents will opt for cheap and cheerful, high quality designer glasses for children make a great investment. The important thing is getting it right! So, without further ado, let’s find out how to pick out the best designer specs for kids.

Get Them Involved Early On


The best thing is to get your child involved in the decision-making process from the get go, because it’s very important that they like the style and fit of their specs. Remember, you might be making the final purchase, but it’s them who will be wearing the eyewear day after day.


A great way to get young children involved is to choose a range of options within your price range. This is guaranteed to keep both parents and children happy whilst ensuring that your child still gets the final say on their new set of designer glasses.


Narrow Down Your Style Choices


Start by narrowing down some style choices. Remember that school-aged children are very trend-conscious. Chances are they will have a particular style in mind already, so have a discussion with your child about which looks they like ahead of time.


This is particularly important if the young person is a bit reluctant to wear specs. There’s a possibility that they may be worried about being teased in the playground, so picking a pair that they reall love will help them feel confident in their skin day in, day out.

Top Tips for Buying Designer Glasses for Children

Factor in Lifestyle and Activity Levels


Opt for a frame that will hold up against your youngster’s activity levels. Think about factors like construction materials and staying power. If your child plays a lot of sports or is a ball of activity 24/7 then it’s wise to steer away from anything too delicate. Instead look for a more durable pair. There’s a whole range of quality designer glasses brands that make strong and lightweight specs, which are ideal for active children.


Check Potential Prescription Restrictions


Before letting your child fall in love with their favourite set of specs, make sure you’ve checked with the optician that those particular frames are compatible with their prescription, in order to avoid any potential disappointment. Your optician will be able to tell you which frame styles can be fitted with your child’s unique prescription.


Make Sure Those Designer Glasses Fit


Lastly, make sure that you get the new frames personally fitted by your optometrist. This is super important for their comfort and will ensure that the new pair of specs can accommodate them as they grow.


Finding the perfect pair of designer glasses for your child need not be a difficult challenge. By getting them involved in style choice and ensuring that fit and function come first, your youngster will have their very own set of super stylish eyewear that will last and last.


Author Plate


David Paul opticians epitomise everything you want from a local eyewear specialist. Not only do they offer eye tests, they provide an expert service that includes OCT testing, advice on buying your ultimate pair of designer glasses and much more. The team of experienced eyewear specialists and expert optometrists are there to make your glasses and contact lens buying experience the best it can be. 

Top Tips for Buying Designer Glasses for Children by Laura Jeeves


Breast Cancer Treatment Overview

 Breast Cancer Treatment Overview

Breast Cancer Treatment Overview


Breast Cancer Treatment involves the removal of cancerous cells from the breast. Procedural treatment of Breast Cancer may involve the removal of the breast. The process is called mastectomy. The average cost of Breast Cancer Treatment in India varies from 2500-8000 USD. It is based upon the hospital location, kind of therapy, and period of the disease.

India, with the advent of technology, can adept better treatment principles for curing breast cancer in the country.


The best doctors and medical staff could ensure The availability of the best treatment plan. They can offer you the best treatment option based on the diagnosis.


Cancerous cells are destroyed and patients are cured.

Breast Cancer Cost


Breast Cancer Treatment Overview 

What are the Symptoms of Breast Cancer?

Basic Symptoms of the disease is:

Discharge from nipples. Presence of a lump that has a different feeling from the rest of the breast. Change in the apparent appearance of the nipples. Change in skin color or texture. Skin dimpling. The procedure of Breast Cancer Treatment The treatment plan for breast cancer treatment involves surgery. Radiation therapy follows it. The entire plan is prepared based on diagnosis and the stage where the cancer is reached.


Stages of Breast Cancer

Doctors select the treatment plan based on the size of the tumor and the area up to which it has spread. To determine the stage, doctors need to know:

If the cancer is invasive or non-invasive. Size of the tumor. Involvement of Lymph Nodes. Whether the cancer is spread to nearby tissues or organs. The people come up with certain questions regarding breast cancer such as how early detection of cancer can be a savior, what can be done to reduce the risk of cancer, the signs, and symptoms of cancer, what are the guidelines women should follow to take care of the health of their breasts, the cause for the breast cancer, what treatment can be used for its cure.


Why consider India for Breast Cancer Treatment?


India is promising as one of the favorite destinations for Breast Cancer tourism in the world due to its affordability, accessibility, and much cheaper rates.


India has become one of the most promising countries for all types of medical and Breast Cancer treatment from a highly skilled

 Oncologist at many affordable prices. After surgery or treatment patients and attendant, There are many Visiting places in India such as spiritual or historic palaces & museums to snow peaks, long coastline, backwater, rich heritage, and much  more.

Breast Cancer Treatment Overview by Shekhar Dussal

The heart-stopping reality of cardiac arrest

The heart-stopping reality of cardiac arrest


Wherever you are, you run.” The next cardiac arrest could strike a patient dozing in their hospital bed, lying in the catheterisation lab or walking down some hallway in between.

One time, Amy Dahart – an intensive care unit nurse at Mary Washington Hospital in Virginia – was part of a cardiac arrest team in a freight elevator, moving a patient from a general ward to the ICU, when the man’s heart stopped. Dahart recounts how another nurse “just launched right up onto that bed, straddled the guy, and started doing compressions… we wheeled him right into the ICU, right through the doors without missing a beat”.

When a cardiac arrest happens, says cardiologist Brahmajee Nallamothu, “that individual automatically becomes the sickest person in the whole hospital”.

Each year millions of people worldwide will suffer an arrest, their hearts abruptly ceasing to beat. Many of these arrests happen in hospital – in the US, roughly one-third – and yet little attention has focused on how to improve treatment of these. A review of 92 randomised controlled studies conducted worldwide, most of them outside of the US, found that just 11 covered the treatment of in-hospital arrests.

Nallamothu, who practises at the University of Michigan, is part of a cohort of cardiologists and other researchers that are trying to dig into the nuts and bolts of in-hospital arrests, in large part to solve an unsettling conundrum. For years now, the science of how to bring someone back from essentially the dead hasn’t changed much: chest compressions, an electrical jolt from a defibrillator if the heart rhythm is considered shockable, making sure the patient is on a ventilator or has some breathing assistance, along with administering fluids and a few key drugs.

So why is a patient’s chance of surviving at some hospitals, such as the one where Dahart works, significantly higher than at others?

“That’s what’s troubling,” says Paul Chan, a leading cardiac arrest researcher at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, who works closely with Nallamothu. “That’s what gives people the head-scratching moment.”

The effort to restart someone’s heart is a physical one, requiring chest compressions that mimic the pump, pump, pump of the heart, pushing oxygen-rich blood to the brain.

The compressions must be fast – roughly 110 a minute, nearly two per second – using straight arms, pushing down 5 to 6 cm on the patient’s breastbone. To help maintain those rapid compressions, Dahart will sometimes encourage others in the team to sing the staccato rhythm of the Bee Gees’ Stayin’ Alive.

The exertion can leave a clinician drenched in sweat, their triceps burning from the effort. Occasionally the patient’s ribs will crack beneath the force. If the patient has just had open-heart surgery, Dahart says she might wrap a clipboard with a towel, so she can more evenly distribute the pressure of the compressions across the chest, reducing the possibility of re-fracturing the breastbone.

Dahart, part of a cadre of ICU nurses dedicated to cardiac arrest at her hospital, always ensures that another colleague is poised to step in after two minutes.

“As you fatigue, two minutes is a long time,” Dahart says. “If you’re doing it correctly, you are going to beg for mercy after about a minute and a quarter.”

With each passing minute that a patient’s heart isn’t beating, damage to brain tissue, and thus long-term disability or death, is increasingly likely.

When Olga Rafidi arrived at an emergency room in Ohio, she was walked to the room where clinicians had been working to restore her 48-year-old sister’s heartbeat during a series of arrests. They had been trying for 90 minutes.

Olga describes the next few minutes like it happened yesterday, not six years ago. The nurse, she says, was exhausted. “She could barely talk.” And the room looked like a “war zone”. Plastic, paper, gloves and other medical trash were strewn everywhere, the doctor and other clinicians soaked by their own sweat.

Her sister, Rima Rafidi-Kern, was tied to tubes, not moving.

“She looked like if you would take a piece of meat, like a steak, and beat it, and how it gets thin and big. That’s how she looked. She looked wider and thinner. There was no muscle tone. And she was grey, literally grey.”

But the clinicians had regained a pulse. They raced with Rima to the ICU. Olga took off her shoes and followed them, running.

Created by Wellcome

The heart-stopping reality of cardiac arrest

By Charlotte Huff


Cardiac arrests are usually deadly, even when they happen in well-equipped, well-staffed hospitals. So researchers are trying to understand how best to help more people survive and recover.

Tweet (opens in a new tab) Share by email (opens an email client) Share on Facebook (opens in a new tab) Share link

“Wherever you are, you run.” The next cardiac arrest could strike a patient dozing in their hospital bed, lying in the catheterisation lab or walking down some hallway in between.

One time, Amy Dahart – an intensive care unit nurse at Mary Washington Hospital in Virginia – was part of a cardiac arrest team in a freight elevator, moving a patient from a general ward to the ICU, when the man’s heart stopped. Dahart recounts how another nurse “just launched right up onto that bed, straddled the guy, and started doing compressions… we wheeled him right into the ICU, right through the doors without missing a beat”.

When a cardiac arrest happens, says cardiologist Brahmajee Nallamothu, “that individual automatically becomes the sickest person in the whole hospital”.

Each year millions of people worldwide will suffer an arrest, their hearts abruptly ceasing to beat. Many of these arrests happen in hospital – in the US, roughly one-third – and yet little attention has focused on how to improve treatment of these. A review of 92 randomised controlled studies conducted worldwide, most of them outside of the US, found that just 11 covered the treatment of in-hospital arrests.

Nallamothu, who practises at the University of Michigan, is part of a cohort of cardiologists and other researchers that are trying to dig into the nuts and bolts of in-hospital arrests, in large part to solve an unsettling conundrum. For years now, the science of how to bring someone back from essentially the dead hasn’t changed much: chest compressions, an electrical jolt from a defibrillator if the heart rhythm is considered shockable, making sure the patient is on a ventilator or has some breathing assistance, along with administering fluids and a few key drugs.

So why is a patient’s chance of surviving at some hospitals, such as the one where Dahart works, significantly higher than at others?

“That’s what’s troubling,” says Paul Chan, a leading cardiac arrest researcher at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, who works closely with Nallamothu. “That’s what gives people the head-scratching moment.”

© Merijn Hos for Mosaic

The effort to restart someone’s heart is a physical one, requiring chest compressions that mimic the pump, pump, pump of the heart, pushing oxygen-rich blood to the brain.

The compressions must be fast – roughly 110 a minute, nearly two per second – using straight arms, pushing down 5 to 6 cm on the patient’s breastbone. To help maintain those rapid compressions, Dahart will sometimes encourage others in the team to sing the staccato rhythm of the Bee Gees’ Stayin’ Alive.

The exertion can leave a clinician drenched in sweat, their triceps burning from the effort. Occasionally the patient’s ribs will crack beneath the force. If the patient has just had open-heart surgery, Dahart says she might wrap a clipboard with a towel, so she can more evenly distribute the pressure of the compressions across the chest, reducing the possibility of re-fracturing the breastbone.

Dahart, part of a cadre of ICU nurses dedicated to cardiac arrest at her hospital, always ensures that another colleague is poised to step in after two minutes.

“As you fatigue, two minutes is a long time,” Dahart says. “If you’re doing it correctly, you are going to beg for mercy after about a minute and a quarter.”

With each passing minute that a patient’s heart isn’t beating, damage to brain tissue, and thus long-term disability or death, is increasingly likely.

When Olga Rafidi arrived at an emergency room in Ohio, she was walked to the room where clinicians had been working to restore her 48-year-old sister’s heartbeat during a series of arrests. They had been trying for 90 minutes.

Olga describes the next few minutes like it happened yesterday, not six years ago. The nurse, she says, was exhausted. “She could barely talk.” And the room looked like a “war zone”. Plastic, paper, gloves and other medical trash were strewn everywhere, the doctor and other clinicians soaked by their own sweat.

Her sister, Rima Rafidi-Kern, was tied to tubes, not moving.

“She looked like if you would take a piece of meat, like a steak, and beat it, and how it gets thin and big. That’s how she looked. She looked wider and thinner. There was no muscle tone. And she was grey, literally grey.”

But the clinicians had regained a pulse. They raced with Rima to the ICU. Olga took off her shoes and followed them, running.

While the heart itself is a muscle, it’s electricity that drives the thumping rhythm of its four chambers, two upper (atria) and two lower (ventricles).

Every heartbeat begins with the body’s natural pacemaker, called the sinus node, which produces an electrical impulse that travels first across the two upper chambers. The atria then contract, pushing blood into the ventricles below. From there, blood is pushed – again driven by electrical impulses – from the ventricles to the lungs, the brain and the rest of the body.

A cardiac arrest is different from a heart attack, which occurs when blood flow is blocked or reduced to an area of the heart, and nearby tissue begins to die. An arrest may follow a heart attack, but the cause is some type of disruption to the heart’s electrical system. It’s immediately life-threatening.

Sometimes the result is a total lack of electrical activity – known medically as asystole and more commonly as flatlining. This is extremely dangerous and hard to treat.

Or the patient might develop ventricular fibrillation, sometimes called VF or V-fib, where the electrical impulses become disorganised and the lower chambers quiver uselessly, unable to pump blood.

VF is considered shockable, potentially able to be righted with a defibrillator – that whining charging sound and the shout of “Clear!” that we hear in medical dramas.

But the reality of cardiac arrest differs from what’s depicted on screen. In a 1996 study that looked at 97 television drama episodes involving 60 CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) attempts (in hospitals and elsewhere), three-quarters of the fictional patients survived, at least in the short term. That can influence our ideas about recovery rates.

A more recent study, published in 2015, looked at the beliefs of family members and other decision makers for ICU patients. It found that nearly three-quarters of them thought that the chance of surviving an arrest exceeded 75 per cent.

The true post-arrest odds, albeit improving, are grimmer. One analysis, involving 24 studies of in-hospital cardiac arrest, found that the chance of leaving the hospital alive averaged about 15 per cent.

Neither does what’s depicted on the screen fully reflect the actual resuscitation experience. Trying to restart someone’s heart is a messy and, in some respects, undignified process, full of beeping machines, ventilators and other paraphernalia. Much of the patient’s skin is left exposed. The room is crowded with clinicians.

And the fictional finale to CPR – survival or death – is less clear-cut than screenwriters would have us believe. Medical dramas typically don’t show patients who regain a pulse but are then a shadow of their former selves. Slightly more than a quarter of in-hospital arrest survivors will live with some degree of brain damage, according to a US study that looked at nearly 85,000 patients from 2000 to 2009. At worst, a survivor might be severely brain-damaged, indefinitely tied to a ventilator.

Fictional patients, says registered nurse Mary Mancini, “come back so nice and clean”.

Patients who are already in the hospital when they have their attack – whether the emergency room or elsewhere – benefit from having doctors, nurses and equipment mere steps away. But they are often already quite ill, whether they’ve been coping with heart failure for years or have recently developed a severe condition, such as sepsis.

For some patients, an arrest might be the final “pathway towards death,” says Brahmajee Nallamothu. For instance, just 7 per cent of patients with advanced cancer survive an in-hospital arrest, according to one analysis.

But the notable variations in survival between hospitals offer some hope, Nallamothu says, that more lives might be saved if hospitals with below-average survival rates adopted some of the strategies of those with better survival rates.

Tony Williams was one of the lucky ones. He was undergoing minor elective surgery in 2018 to remove some large cysts from his back and shoulder, and shortly after the anaesthesia began, his heart stopped.

“It was completely unexpected,” says Tony, who’s 63 and from Herefordshire in England. Tony’s heart had gone into VF, the electrical signals firing in a rapid and disorganised fashion. Three minutes and several shocks later, his heart had been restarted.

Thump. Thump. Thump.

Despite what’s portrayed in the popular media, though, defibrillation is not commonly part of resuscitation. Only one out of five cardiac arrests can benefit from an electric shock.

For this minority of patients, their chance of surviving to leave the hospital are roughly double that of the other four-fifths, according to US registry data. But speed is vital: the sooner you start getting shocked, the better your odds. One study found that nearly one-third of defibrillations started more than two minutes after arrest.

And, throughout the process, continuous chest compressions are vital. “Compressions replace your heartbeat,” says David Heegeman, an emergency physician at Marshfield Medical Center in Wisconsin, which also has been studied by Nallamothu and others for its above-average survival rates. “If your compressions stop, you have no blood flow to the brain.”

When Heegeman analysed cardiac arrests at his hospital some years ago, he realised that compressions sometimes stopped for as long as 30 seconds, such as when the patient’s pulse was checked. Now any pauses are as short as possible, ideally just five seconds to check for a pulse, or to step back right before the next shock is delivered.

While CPR and defibrillation are going on, doctors and other clinicians are striving to figure out what triggered the arrest. It could be a heart attack or a severe condition like sepsis or a toxic exposure, among other possibilities.

Tony’s arrest was caused, he later learned, by an out-of-the-blue anaphylactic reaction to a type of antibiotic he was given during the surgery. He stayed in the ICU in a medically induced coma for several days afterwards. His shaken anaesthesiologist came by to visit him after he was transferred out of intensive care.

“He said, ‘I just would love to shake the hand of the man who survived that, because we didn’t give you much chance.’”

Survival has been improving, at least in the US, based on data coming out of a voluntary registry of hospitals set up two decades ago by the American Heart Association. By 2009, 22 per cent of patients survived to hospital discharge, up from 14 per cent in 2000.

Those strides, though, may not reflect US hospitals overall. Even today, just under 10 per cent of US hospitals participate in the registry, notes Paul Chan, a cardiologist at Saint Luke’s in Missouri. “We may be capturing the best-case scenario.”

Databases and registries of in-hospital cardiac arrests have been launched in other countries in recent years, including in Japan and the UK. But the US registry has one of the longest track records, yielding numerous studies and insights.

For instance, slightly more than half of these arrests occur at night or the weekend. But your shot at survival then is markedly lower, likely in large part because there are fewer staff around.

The ongoing research has exposed a fundamental truth. Your chance of walking away from an in-hospital arrest varies significantly depending upon which hospital you happen to collapse in – even among the roughly 10 per cent of hospitals that participate in the Heart Association’s quality improvement registry.

One analysis, which sorted 468 hospitals from the registry into ten groups based on survival, found that 12 per cent of patients survived in the worst-performing group versus 23 per cent in the top group. Even among similar types of hospitals, such as academic ones or rural ones, there were wide variations in survival rates.

In recent years, Chan, Nallamothu and other researchers have conducted interviews and onsite visits at hospitals with above-average results, including the hospitals where Dahart and Heegeman work.

Increasingly, they’re realising that resuscitation is a team sport that can only be pulled off if the members have been extensively trained, for example with surprise drills, and if they know their precise roles as soon as they arrive.

“I use the analogy sometimes of an orchestra trying to play a beautiful song but they have never practised together,” says Heegeman. “How could you pull that off?”

Add to that the enormous time pressures – to perform perfectly, instantaneously. Compared with treating a heart attack, where the goal is to open that blocked vessel within the first hour, the crux of cardiac arrest treatment ideally should be completed within a far tighter time frame, Chan says. “It’s not 60 minutes, it’s 2 minutes.”

Hospitals with better survival results often have dedicated teams, with members like Dahart who can drop whatever they are doing and race to a code, as cardiac arrests are known in medical parlance. “I just disappear – I don’t even explain,” she says.

Dahart, a nurse for nearly three decades, says that being part of this team is something that she was born to do. “I love codes. I’m not going to lie. I love the adrenaline.” The team, which handles other crises as well, works closely with doctors, respiratory therapists and numerous other clinicians.

But ICU nurses are the team’s core. They debrief after a resuscitation attempt about what went right and what didn’t. Dahart is among those who educate other clinicians about signs that a patient could be imminently vulnerable to an arrest, ideally so the patient can be moved to the ICU before it happens.

When Heegeman started working to improve cardiac arrest survival rates more than a decade ago, he got push-back from some clinicians, who said they already knew how to resuscitate someone. While their clinical skills were strong, Heegeman quickly realised that people needed to practise more as a team, so crucial time wasn’t squandered.

For example, a clinician might arrive to a call but then wait for a leader to assign their role. Sometimes there could be confusion, with two people told to get a defibrillator while another task was left undone. Or too many clinicians could flood the area, making it noisy and difficult to manoeuvre in an already high-pressure crisis.

At his Wisconsin hospital, these days code team members at the start of each shift are assigned colourful lanyards with their cardiac arrest roles on it for that day, whether that’s respiratory therapist or CPR or lab work. So when a code is called, they can pitch in immediately and know everyone’s responsibility. “You don’t even have to say a word and the whole thing is getting done,” says Heegeman.

Rima Rafidi-Kern’s neurologist was pessimistic, given the 90 minutes it had taken to restore a steady pulse. He told her family that she had less than a 1 per cent chance of waking up, Olga says. And, as Olga recounts it, he said that if by some miracle she would wake up, she would likely have overwhelming brain damage. 

feeling a sense of crossing into heaven. But as she came to, connected to the ventilator with her mother sitting nearby, she became temporarily disoriented. She saw what seemed to be the mirage of her father, with his arm wrapped around her mother.

Family members took shifts at Rima’s bedside, never leaving her alone. Her twin sister flew in. Priests visited, praying at her bedside. As they were approaching the fifth day after the arrest, Olga says, the family were feeling increasing pressure to make decisions on whether to let Rima go. Then she began to stir, her eyes opening. She tried to mouth words around the ventilator tube that snaked from her mouth: “What happened?” 

On social media, cardiac arrest survivors swap stories about memory loss, the number of minutes they were deprived of oxygen and whether they recall any out-of-body experiences. Rima doesn’t remember seeing any light or feeling a sense of crossing into heaven. But as she came to, connected to the ventilator with her mother sitting nearby, she became temporarily disoriented. She saw what seemed to be the mirage of her father, with his arm wrapped around her mother.

Rima reached out to touch her mother’s face. Was she really there in the room? Despite her disorientation, she knew her dad had died some years before

In the weeks after her arrest, Rima learned to live with a few compression-related fractures, discomfort that she gladly accepted as the cost of a second chance at life. Doctors later determined that the anaesthesia from her back surgery had stressed her heart, which already had an undiagnosed blockage.

Olga keeps coming back to what the first doctor told her, the one who started compressions after Rima collapsed in front of him in the emergency room. Normally they would have stopped after about half an hour, he said, as the heart monitor showed a flatline. But the doctor swore he could feel the thread of a pulse. So they continued.

In the years since, Rima has spent a total of roughly six months in two inpatient rehabilitation facilities, working on her memory skills, language and how to handle daily tasks. She needed to use a walker at first, and then a quad cane. Her grown son moved back in to help her for several years.

These days she’s back to living independently, but she acknowledges that it’s more difficult for her to learn new things. She used to love to read, but has difficulty following a book, “especially if it has a lot of characters”.

As for Tony Williams, when he first left the hospital he struggled to walk and dress himself, and he has only recently returned to work full-time as a construction site manager. Initially, he dwelled a lot on his near miss with death. “There was a feeling, especially in the initial stages, you go to sleep and in the back of the mind you’re thinking, ‘Are you going to wake up?’”

With more people surviving cardiac arrests, researchers are trying to get a better sense of what happens after they leave the hospital. Some patients need more support after they return home, says Mary Mancini, who is based at the University of Texas at Arlington and is one of the founders of the American Heart Association’s registry. “They had a truly life-altering event. They were dead. And we brought them back.”

Written by Charlotte Huff

Stress Relief - 5 Best Tips to Reduce Stress

Stress Relief - 5 Best Tips to Reduce Stress

Stress relief - 5 best tips to reduce stress
Stress relief - 5 best tips to reduce stress

 
Stress has become an integral part of our lifestyle. We cannot live a single moment without stress. However, not all stresses are always bad. In practice, there are good stress and bad stress. For example, you can not perform well in your exam, if you are not going through a minimum level of stress. However, you exam can turn to its worst, if you experience too much stress.

According to psychological definition, the objects of events, able to produce stress, are known as stressors. Stressors are responsible for producing stress in our life. Stress relief thus refers to the mechanism or condition by using which we can either eliminate or minimize the effect of stressors from our environment. This article sensibly focuses on the various available attributes that offer stress relief condition.

Stress is a psychological factor that influences a being essentially in three ways - biological, psychological and social. Although various medications are available claiming to provide beneficial result in stress relief, but none of them are proven to be more effective than yoga, meditation, and other relaxation technique.
 Whenever we experience stress, our body undergoes thorough varieties of hormonal and biochemical alternations. Prolonged exposure to stress can result in permanent alteration of biochemical processes in the body.
If you do regular exercise, it may help balancing biochemical products within your body system and may promote a healthy balance between body and mind. The exercises that are particularly useful for stress relief are deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, yoga, tai chi, massage therapy, normal exercise, and sensory approaches.

Stress Relief - 5 Best Tips to Reduce Stress

Deep Breathing Exercise

Practicing deep breathing exercise can reduce stress to a great extent. Deep breathing exercise not only involves the lungs but also portions of abdomen. If you would like to experience abdominal breathing, the first thing you need is to sit comfortably with straight back. Then you put one hand on your stomach and the other one on chest. Now as you inhale, you may experience a rise on your stomach. At the time of exhale, you need to extract air from your body by contracting your abdominal muscles. This stress relief exercise can be practiced anywhere in combination with any other relaxation exercises like music therapy or aromatherapy.

Progressive Muscle Relaxation

You can practice progressive muscle relaxation exercise along with deep breathing exercise. In progressive muscle relaxation, you need to perform a controlled contraction and relaxation of muscles. It is absolutely recommended that you should loosen your outfits to make it really comfortable. Now you need to make your toe muscles tight for 10 seconds, then relax them slowly and enjoy the experience. You need to move slowly to other parts of the body gradually. During this process, you need to breathe deeply but slowly. It will provide you an exquisite experience of stress relief.

Meditation

Meditation helps you to focus your mind on to a particular focal point. It indeed helps you to develop a condition called mindfulness. Mindfulness is a condition when you can have an optimum control on your random thoughts pattern, sensory input, body sensations, response to environmental stimuli and many other psychological processes.
Guided imagery or visualization is an integral part of meditation in which one is allowed to visualize a scene to feel at peace. This allows letting go all of the anxieties, concerns and tensions.

Yoga

Yoga is such an ancient practice that works essentially in three levels - psychological, physiological and spiritual. The goal of this practice is to attain the state of completeness. There are significant varieties of yoga and each of the components include spiritual element. Most remarkable among all are asana, pranayama and hatha yoga. Yoga offers a dynamic peacefulness within a being. There is no possible adverse side effect of yoga. However, yoga should not be practiced without the guidance of yoga master.

Tai Chi

Tai Chi is a form of martial art, originally evolved during 13th century. In its contemporary form, it is practiced to offer calmness in mind, body rejuvenation, and stress reduction. The main aim of the practitioner is to focus on the breathing pattern and to keep the awareness in the present.

Dr John Anne is an herbal specialist with years of experience and extensive research on herbs and alternative health. If you are looking for more information, read about Causes of Stress at http://www.ayurvediccure.com/stress-relief.htmAyurvedicCure.com is the World's Largest Alternative Health Portal. You can also Participate in Health Questions & Answers, Discussion Forums and Blogs. Also read about Natural Cure for Depression at Natural Depression Treatment

Stress Relief - 5 Best Tips to Reduce Stress

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/800211

Stress and Panic Attacks - How to Reduce Stress to Avoid Panic Attacks

 

Stress and Panic Attacks - How to Reduce Stress to Avoid Panic Attacks

Stress and Panic Attacks - How to Reduce Stress to Avoid Panic Attacks
Stress and Panic Attacks - How to Reduce Stress to Avoid Panic Attacks

How to Reduce Stress to Avoid Panic Attacks

When we lose focus, we allow stress to settle in and then domino effect of depression, anxiety takes over and that ultimately has a negative effect or our overall health. Stress is one of the main ingredients in illnesses such as diabetes, heart attacks and of course anxiety attacks.

So how do we combat stress? Well let's first understand that there are two forms of stress. Good stress and bad stress.
Good Stress will keep you alert of matters. It's a short term effort from your body to handle pressure situations. For example, a vicious dog is charging down the street towards you, the good stress will make you react and get out of the way. 

All your senses go to work, your adrenaline gets high, muscles get pumped and your heart beats fast and your mind makes the decision causing you to react. So in essence stress can be your body's emergency alert announcement.

Bad Stress is the prolong use of all those instances listed in Good Stress. With bad stress, your body remains in a pressured state. This causes blood pressure to remain high which causes continued elevations of sugar, cholesterol and the like to take residence in the blood stream.

What are the symptoms of bad stress? Stress itself is a symptom. You always have this anxious feeling about you. Other symptoms are the tense neck, bad and often headaches. Stress can be a contributor more chronic headaches such as migraines.

So what are some easy ways to regain focus and ease the stress in your life? Create an organization program for yourself.
How?

Stress and Panic Attacks - How to Reduce Stress to Avoid Panic Attacks

• Take two hours out of your weekend schedule to prepare for the up coming work week

• Cook and freeze healthy meals in advance so that you can always have lunch ready for work. ( This is also great for budgets)

• Create a budget. Ensure that you always pay yourself first. Even if it's only five dollars a week, pay yourself first.
Next, gain control to regain focus. Understanding that we don't control others actions gives us new life to focus on the one thing we can control, ourselves.

• Do what you can with what you have, the rest is out of your control, accept that

• Think in the positive, it allows your to regain strength

• Understand that these are small temporary learning obstacles that you can overcome
Here are a few ideas to help you out throughout the day.

• Keep a small copy of your family or love ones on you at all times. It's a great reference point when you feel like giving in

• Keep in small container of your favorite lotion or scent with you at all times. When you're feeling down put just a touch of it behind your ear. Sometime we just need a sweetness in the air to lift us up

• Drink a tall glass of ice water. Nothing compares to the refreshment of water. From the moment you start drinking it, the cool bring you to another level.

• Take deep meaningful breathes. When you inhale think positive, when you exhale feel positive.
Planning and preparation can greatly reduce our stress. Taking along positive reminders of the things we cherish in life can help us refocus and handle many pressures relieving ourselves of undo stress.
Leslie Rojan is the Founder/Editor of Strawberrie Martini Presents... "Me Time" - The Gift Every Woman Needs. This site is dedicated to women.

Our Love Letters gift bag/basket campaign is our walking trade show. This an ideal advertising opportunity for small businesses and independents who want to place their sample products into the hands of thousands of women.

Also, Her Stories and Pink Pages Book Club. Dedicated to stories with a strong female lead or presence. A great place for new authors/self-published/traditionally published to showcase their work.

Stress and Panic Attacks - How to Reduce Stress to Avoid Panic Attacks

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6379782